• James E Aarons DVM

Ancient Charioteers


I wanted to delve into the roots of western religious civilization. I needed to understand why religion is so fucked up.

I found the answer.

The religious beliefs that came into being at the end of the Bronze Age eliminated the female voice.

The 13th century BC was the tail end of the bronze age, when militarism came to dominate empires.

Bronze weapons came about through a manufacturing process that piqued men's minds. Those who became good at making and using weapons of war easily dominated the rest of civilization. The men with the weapons became the voice of progress as well as the formatters of new religious theory.

The pharaoh Akhenaten was the first person to not only kick women from the religious pantheon; he also chose one god, the sun god Aten, to be supreme above them all. Akhenaten's monotheism pre-empted the Bible narrative. In fact the Bible formatters brought this idea of religious monotheism into ancient Israel through the ancient port of Gubla, also called Byblos, the place the Bible was named after. Egyptians wrote their ideas on papyrus, an early form of paper while the rest of the known world continued to use clay tablets for correspondence.

The Bible's Exodus never actually happened. The event cannot be placed in history. No pharaoh is mentioned in the Bible that would pinpoint when this occurred.

The Ten Commandments have never been found either despite the plethora of clay tablets uncovered thus far, pushing parts of the Old Testament into a fictional never-never land.

Instead of an actual movement of real people, the Exodus is a religious narrative reinforcing the change in thought that pervaded the entire Middle East at the time. This thought led to the rise of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. All three religions began here.

The early religion formatters used the Exodus from Egypt because that's where the idea of monotheism came from. They also used the story of Abraham to tell everyone this religion was also rooted in the ancient beliefs that came from the Cradle of Civilization. Abraham is said to have come from the city of Ur, the place where the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers merged.

Who were the gods of Ur? There were many. However Enki, or El was the most powerful male and Inanna was his female equal. Inanna became Ishtar, Astarte, and Astoreth by the time the Bblical narrative took shape.

Katie is introduced as Ishtar, but her legacy began as Inanna, the Goddess overseeing the Cradle of Civilization. By 13th century BC her influence spread even to Egypt. The Bible calls Ishtar, Astoreth an idolatrous goddess. Later Ishtar becomes Aphrodite, then Venus.

Isthar was worshipped in the pantheon by the horse people who migrated from the mountains of Ararat, between the Black and Caspian Seas. These are the chariot people I affiliate Katie with. It is interesting that the Bible mentions this place as the resting site of Noah's ark. In reality, this is the area where the horse people came from. Possibly the legacy and power of the horse people of Ararat were used metaphorically because that is where the power to enforce the new religion came from.

Abraham's narrative closely follows the migration of the horse people into Egypt during the 14th century BC. Historical data correlates this influx with a wave of people called the Hyksos, identifying them as horse people from the Armenian highlands.

Abraham's journey into Egypt occurred in the 16th century BC, the same time the Hyksos migrated into Egypt.

By the 13th century, during the reign of Akhenaten, major political changes occurred that focused on Egypt's attempt to maintain control of ancient Israel. Egypt needed this area to maintain trading ties with the silk road, but the horse people in Syria prevented this from happening at the Battle of Kadesh in 1284 BC. This was the first recorded chariot battle in history.

Most people do not know that Nefertiti, the world famous queen of Egypt, (Akhenaten's primary wife) was the women that revolutionized the Nile valley by bringing sun worship into Egypt, was an Armenian highlander. Queen Nefertiti of Egypt was a native of Mitanni. The Mittani kingdom of the Armenian Highlands was an off-shoot of the Hurrian kingdom. The Hurri and the Mittani were in turn the contemporaries of other Armenian highlanders, the Hittites and most probably the Hykos.

(revordi.blogspot.com/2005/12/egypt-hyksos-and-armenia-most.html)

Kikkuli, the fellow who befriends Katie in these ancient times is an actual figure. He wrote more than a hundred tablets on training horses. Originally he is in Mitanni controlled territory, but jumps to the Hittite sphere of influence when he sees King Tushratta's Mitanni kingdom crumble. This is when Katie enters the picture.

Archaeological evidence of horse domestication dates from 4000 BC in the Eurasian Steppes of the Ukraine. There, Indo‐Europeans rode horses and herded them for meat. This had profound social and economic consequences which led to the development of nomadic equestrian cultures. The earliest direct evidence of riding is from Mesopotamian plaques, and correspondence of the Kings of Mari (2000 BC). Indo‐Europeans brought the horse to the Near East and there, outside its natural habitat, used specialised knowledge to raise and train horses on a large scale for military use. Hittite instructions on training chariot horses are contained in the Kikkuli text from Anatolia (1350 BC). Systematic conditioning, grain feeding and elements of ‘interval training’ are notable. Equine prescriptions were also recovered from Ugarit (Syria) which indicate a rational approach to veterinary medicine in the same era. With the evolution of effective training and tools, chariots, metal bits, and the recurve bow, horses became formidable weapons of war. Mounted bowmen succeeded chariots in warfare, particularly nomadic Scythians who dominated Central Asia (1000‐500 BC). In the Middle East (Iraq), Assyrians assembled a powerful military empire and employed a vast and skilled cavalry (900‐612 BC). The first surviving text on training cavalry mounts is by the Athenian General Xenophon (400 BC) who reveals a sensitive understanding of the horse. Although the horse has been used for herding, transportation and sport, a recurring stimulus for horsemanship throughout history has been its military role.

Not only did the Hyksos bring cultural traits with them to Egypt, but they also took ideas from the Egyptians. There was a slight mixing in their religions as the Hyksos adopted the god Seth while contributing Astarte and Reshef to the Egyptian repertoire. Reshef was the god of war and thunder. He is portrayed holding a battle-axe, a spear and a shield. He fathered Min, the god of fertility, and his wife was Itum. Memphis is the site of his temple, where he was worshiped mainly by immigrants. Astarte, the goddess of fertility, beauty, war and love, was often identified with Isis and Hathor. Although she was revered by the Hyksos and similarly by the Egyptians, she was kept ‘alive’ and important by the Phoenicians, who built temples devoted to her in Cyprus.

Archaeological evidence of horse domestication dates from 4000 BC in the Eurasian Steppes of the Ukraine. There, Indo‐Europeans rode horses and herded them for meat. This had profound social and economic consequences which led to the development of nomadic equestrian cultures. The earliest direct evidence of riding is from Mesopotamian plaques, and correspondence of the Kings of Mari (2000 BC). Indo‐Europeans brought the horse to the Near East and there, outside its natural habitat, used specialised knowledge to raise and train horses on a large scale for military use. Hittite instructions on training chariot horses are contained in the Kikkuli text from Anatolia (1350 BC). Systematic conditioning, grain feeding and elements of ‘interval training’ are notable. Equine prescriptions were also recovered from Ugarit (Syria) which indicate a rational approach to veterinary medicine in the same era. With the evolution of effective training and tools, chariots, metal bits, and the recurve bow, horses became formidable weapons of war. Mounted bowmen succeeded chariots in warfare, particularly nomadic Scythians who dominated Central Asia (1000‐500 BC). In the Middle East (Iraq), Assyrians assembled a powerful military empire and employed a vast and skilled cavalry (900‐612 BC). The first surviving text on training cavalry mounts is by the Athenian General Xenophon (400 BC) who reveals a sensitive understanding of the horse. Although the horse has been used for herding, transportation and sport, a recurring stimulus for horsemanship throughout history has been its military role.

How's that for a plot to work from?